South Talks: Act, react, decolonize. The Southern questions today
Sep
9
1:00pm 1:00pm

South Talks: Act, react, decolonize. The Southern questions today

  • CARTEC – Cava Arte Contemporanea, Galleria Comunale d’arte di Cagliari (map)
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7 pm (italy - 1PM EST) | Act, react, decolonize. The Southern questions today

with Luka Bogdanic (University if Zagabria, HR), Houria Bouteldja (Parti des Indegenes de la République, FR), Gianfranco Rebucini (Effimera, I), Atomic Culture (Curatorial platform, NYC), coordinated by Francesco Bachis (University of Cagliari)

8:30 pm | Drinks and food

9:30 pm | Alfredo Jaar (RCH)The Gramsci Trilogy

10 pm | Film Screening: The ashes of Pasolini, Alfredo Jaar

11 pm | Tropical Gothic: Mike Cooper in concert (UK)

*Please note that Workshops are free and for 15-20 participants max

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Closing Party
Mar
18
6:00pm 6:00pm

Closing Party

Join us and some of the artists in the exhibition in celebrating the closing of our exhibition and residency at Loisaida Center. 

Atomic Culture is the joint cultural productions between Matthew Galindo and Malinda Galindo. Whose mission is to become a temporary geopolitical idea-space where people from all backgrounds are encouraged to learn, create, and experience art in it’s myriad forms.

Loisaida’s artistic residency provides a home to develop and explore cultural work that affirms a Latinx provocative spirit to impact local and broader cultural thinking through learning as it promotes diversity, equity, solidarity and community building that strengthens Loisaida and connects it, beyond its borders and limitations, to the broader global community.

Atomic Culture’s dynamic residency projects will encourage active participation by creating art-focused social and cultural programs accessible to everyone. Their opening exhibit titled; Futura Ahora // Future Now will map examples of Latinx arts and cultural practices from Southwest and New York based artists that integrate historical events and traditions to examine how futurism can be used as a decolonizing tool to reclaim land, natural resources, and ways of living that occupying forces have sought to wipe out.

Atomic Culture aims to improve the outlook of our cities by creating art-focused social and cultural programs accessible to everyone, while providing an experiential learning center where artists can create and interact with the next generation of creators and the community at large.

Exhibition:

(1) Future Now // Futura Ahora calls to attention the movement of artists reclaiming and reconfiguring their cultural disposition and narratives with society at large. Through sound, installation, literature, and visual arts each artist presents compelling possibilities for the future by embracing and reclaiming their histories, traditions, and present-day experiences.

http://hyperallergic.com/357236/future-now-futura-ahora-loisaida-center/

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ᗰʊʝɛʀ Gǟṭɦɛʀɨռg✨🌛 with Celeste Casillas of Nativa Remedies
Mar
12
3:00pm 3:00pm

ᗰʊʝɛʀ Gǟṭɦɛʀɨռg✨🌛 with Celeste Casillas of Nativa Remedies

The culture of women gatherings has been going on for eons. Being part of a community of women and sharing in our ancestral knowledge makes us happier, healthier, and more balanced. 

Join Celeste Casillas of Nativa Remedies and other women seeking to connect with their feminine wisdom, honor their mother energy, and share sacred space.

We will discuss:

-Using plant medicines to heal our bodies, balance our hormones, and ease stress and anxiety.

-Connecting to the lunar calendar to understand the phases of our own cycle. 

-Ritualizing our life to create balance

-Holistic beauty remedies

The gathering will evolve based on the interest of the group and sharing is optional.

Bring your amiga, sister, mother, a notebook and pen, a yoga mat or thick blanket.

 

Celeste Casillas of Nativa Remedies is a Chicana raised in Los Angeles. 
From an early age she connected to plant medicines in her family garden where she participated in growing food and traditional healing herbs and spices. 
She studied at The Academy of Healing Nutrition in NYC and is a practicing Nutritional Healing Coach. 
In 2013 she spent 8 months in Puebla, Mexico where she learned more about using healing foods and herbs in daily cooking. She believes passionately in Food As Medicine and in re-indigenizing our diets. She continues to study various healing traditions and promotes reconnecting and reclaiming our Ancestral Healing Wisdom for self-healing, creating community and as a tool for decolonization.

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Discussion w/ Guillermo Gomez Pena, Balitronica, and Alex Rivera
Mar
3
6:00pm 6:00pm

Discussion w/ Guillermo Gomez Pena, Balitronica, and Alex Rivera

  • 205 Hudson Street 2nd FL New York, NY, 10013 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Limited Seating Available. CLICK HERE TO RESERVE TICKETS

Press Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Future Now, Futura Ahora
Exhibition Feb. 4, 2017 to March 18, 2017
Performance: Friday, March 3, 2017 6-8PM | 205 Hudson 2nd FL
Students, Free. General Public $25 Suggested Donation

New York City -- Atomic Culture as curatorial artists in residence at Loisaida Center and in conjunction with the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Hunter Artist Action Group, and EyeSpeak presents a two-part keynote address on artivist strategies and interventions. The evening will start with "The Future as Sanctuary" by Alex Rivera, followed by a performative talk by Guillermo Gómez-Peña aka El Mad Mex and Balitronica aka The
Phantom Mariachi.

In “The Future as Sanctuary,” Alex Rivera will discuss different approaches to the terrain of ‘the future’ through his science fictions, virtual realities, and drone interventions. The discussion will include clips of Rivera’s work, from the mid 1990s to the present, work that migrates from present-day crises into post-colonial imaginaries.

Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Balitronica from international performance troupe La Pocha Nostra present a performative talk on their artivist strategies for fighting xenophobia, sexism, homophobia and racism both in the art world and larger society. Alongside their candid conversation, they will invoke performance texts, sound art and a photo slide show of recent work.

This presentation is part of an ongoing exhibition and sidency Future Now, Futura Ahora curated by Atomic Culture at the Loisaida Center. Atomic Culture’s dynamic residency Future Now encourages active participation by creating art-focused social and cultural programs accessible to everyone. The exhibit and correlating programming aim to map examples of cultural practices from the Southwest that integrate historical events and traditions to examine how futurism can be used as a decolonizing tool to reclaim land, natural resources, and ways of living that occupying forces have sought to wipe out. Atomic Culture asks how are art practices used as a tool to confront neo-colonialism?

Guillermo Gómez-Peñ is a performance artist, writer, activist, radical pedagogue and director of the performance troupe La Pocha Nostra. Born in Mexico City, he moved to the US in 1978. His performance work and 11 books have contributed to the debates on cultural & gender diversity, border culture and US-Mexico relations. His art work has been presented at over nine hundred venues across the US, Canada, Latin America, Europe, Russia, South Africa and Australia. A MacArthur Fellow, Bessie and American Book Award winner, he is a regular contributor for newspapers and magazines in the US, Mexico, and Europe and a contributing editor to The Drama Review (NYU-MIT). Gómez-Peña is a Senior Fellow in the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, a Patron for the London-based Live Art Development Agency and in 2012 he was named Samuel Hoi Fellow by USA Artists.

Balitronic is a performance artist, cyborg poet, and queer sex radical raised on the Tijuana/San Diego border. She studied Literature at San Diego State University under the guidance of Harold Jaffe, Edith Frampton, and Sydney Brown. She then relocated to Paris to study American Expat Literature and lived in a 17th century convent with Dominican nuns. Currently living in San Francisco, she recently earned her MFA in Poetry and Queer Theory at Mills College. Since 2013 she has been collaborating with Guillermo Gomez-Pena and La Pocha Nostra and has developed photo-performance projects with Manuel Vason, Herani Hache, RJ Muna, and Marcos Raya. She is currently working on a book titled, “A Brief Conversation With My Psychotherapist” and touring with
Gomez-Pena/La Pocha Nostra.

Alex Rivera s a New York based digital media artist and filmmaker. He was born in 1973 to a native of Peru and a native of New Jersey. Growing up in a bi-cultural channel surfing tract home led him to rethink some assumptions about race, immigration, identity, and the global economy. Over the past fifteen years he’s been making work that illuminates two massive and parallel realities: the globalization of information through the internet, and the globalization of families, and communities, through mass migration.

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Nativa Remedies
Feb
11
4:00pm 4:00pm

Nativa Remedies

Nativa Remedies by Celeste Casillas: Community workshop, discussing ancient healing techniques is a modern setting. 

Many native cultures throughout the world have used plant medicine, herbs and meditative rituals to provide support, healing, restoration of the body, mind and spirit while creating a sense of community and a connection to the land and our ancestors. While many of us have experienced aspects of these healing traditions as children, most of us have lost the connection to the earth and our ancestral wisdom. In this workshop we will explore various benefits of our herbal allies through participating in meditative space clearing techniques, tasting teas, infusions and tinctures and by discussing our diverse personal experiences with traditional healing techniques. 

We will discuss how plant medicine easily fits into our modern lives and how 'ritualizing' our daily self care brings spiritual balance. Reconnecting with our elders and ancient traditions is an integral part of self awareness and strength. Each participant will be able to create an herbal salve to take with them.

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Border Publics, Cultural Activism and Urban Planning with Ricardo Dominguez, Teddy Cruz, Fonna Forman, and Ed Morales
Feb
9
6:30pm 6:30pm

Border Publics, Cultural Activism and Urban Planning with Ricardo Dominguez, Teddy Cruz, Fonna Forman, and Ed Morales

This event is co-sponsored and will be live streamed by The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics.

Border Publics, Cultural Activism and Urban Planning
Renowned scholars, artists, cultural activists and critics––Ricardo Dominguez, Teddy Cruz, Fonna Forman and Ed Morales––converge to discuss their distinct yet cross-cultural geopolitical perspectives on the intersections of arts and culture, activism and policy, and forced migration. We will consider how might our cultural activism, advocacy, and participatory planning begin working to create stronger collaborative movements and build solidarity within and beyond our multiple communities? In the face of political uncertainties, we will also considerwhat tactics and strategies work to strengthen cultural equity advocacy, to influence policy and to advance equity principles as part of what should be enshrined in NYC’s cultural plan. A report-back on the discussion will be included as a set of recommendations to the New York City Council’s 10 year Cultural Plan.

Teddy Cruz is a Professor of Public Culture and Urbanization in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego. He is known internationally for his urban research on the Tijuana/San Diego border, advancing border neighborhoods as sites of cultural production from which to rethink urban policy, affordable housing, and public space. Recipient of the Rome Prize in Architecture in 1991, his honors include representing the US in the 2008 Venice Architecture Biennale, the Ford Foundation Visionaries Award in 2011, and the 2013 Architecture Award from the US Academy of Arts and Letters.

Fonna Forman is a Professor of Political Theory and Founding Director of the Center on Global Justice at the University of California, San Diego. A theorist of ethics and public culture, her work focuses on human rights at the urban scale, climate justice in cities, and equitable urban development in the global south. She serves as Vice-Chair of the University of California Climate Solutions Group, and on the Global Citizenship Commission (advising UN policy on human rights).

Cruz & Forman direct the UCSD Cross-Border Initiative, and are principals in Estudio Teddy Cruz + Forman, a research-based political and architectural practice in San Diego. Their work emphasizes urban conflict and informality as sites of intervention for rethinking public policy and civic infrastructure, with a special emphasis on Latin American cities. Their practice convenes knowledges from across the fields of architecture and urbanism, environmental and social practice, political theory and urban policy, visual arts and public culture, and mediates the interface between top-down institutions and the bottom-up intelligence of marginalized communities. From 2012-13 they served as special advisors on Civic and Urban Initiatives for the City of San Diego and led the development of its Civic Innovation Lab. 

Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project with Brett Stalbaum, Micha Cardenas, Amy Sara Carroll, and Elle Mehrmand, the Transborder Immigrant Tool (a GPS cell phone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/US border) was the winner of “Transnational Communities Award” (2008), an award funded by Cultural Contact, Endowment for Culture Mexico–US and handed out by the US Embassy in Mexico. It is on view at the Loisaida, Inc. Center.

Ed Morales is an author and journalist who has written for The Nation, The NewYork Times, Rolling Stone, and the Guardian, among many others. He is a former Village Voice staff writer and Newsday columnist, and author of Living in Spanglish (St. Martins) and The Latin Beat (Da Capo Press), as well as the upcoming Latinx (Verso Press, Fall 2017). He produced and co-directed Whose Barrio? (2009) a documentary about the gentrification of East Harlem, which is currently available from Kanopy. He is currently a lecturer at Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, is a fellow of a new working group studying the Puerto Rico debt crisis at the Center for the Study of Social Difference, and hosts a radio show on WBAI FM, Pacifica Radio.

Moderator: Andrea Gordillo is a Peruvian-American filmmaker, producer, writer, and activist. She holds a BA in International Relations and currently finishing hers masters in Media and Cultural Studies at NYU, focusing on the Lower East Side's cultural history and its role in contemporary place-making and urban planning. At Loisaida Center she documents and archives events and activities, and serves on the steering committee to develop cultural policy recommendations to the New York City Council.

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Opening | Future Now : Futura Ahora
Feb
4
6:00pm 6:00pm

Opening | Future Now : Futura Ahora

6PM to 8PM

Performance by Cultural Workers w/ Discussion on History of the Agave. Follow by a Tequila and Mezcal tasting.

Future Now // Futura Ahora calls to attention the movement of artists reclaiming and reconfiguring their cultural disposition and narratives with society at large. Through sound, installation, literature, and visual arts each artist presents compelling possibilities for the future by embracing and reclaiming their histories, traditions, and present-day experiences.

During Atomic Culture’s curatorial artist residency at the Loisaida Center. They will bringing together 15 artists native to the southwest United States, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California to discuss futurism and geopolitics. Futurism is not just about technology but an act of self preservation and concern toward the creation and dismemberment of invisible borders, pillaging of natural resources, and colonization. Through decolonization and reclamation of traditions, personal culture, land and natural medicine.

Within the exhibition and workshops each artist addresses these issues blending their complex histories with a contemporary perspective creating a new trajectory.

Future Now/Futura Ahora will host multiple workshops on reclaiming use of the land and the natural remedies she provides you, discussions and screenings on chicanx futurism. The exhibition serving as a catalyst to discuss and initiate thinking and being in a time of increased tension and unknown.

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Future Now : Futura Ahora
Feb
4
to Mar 18

Future Now : Futura Ahora

Future Now // Futura Ahora calls to attention the movement of artists reclaiming and reconfiguring their cultural disposition and narratives with society at large. Through sound, installation, literature, and visual arts each artist presents compelling possibilities for the future by embracing and reclaiming their histories, traditions, and present-day experiences.

During Atomic Culture’s curatorial artist residency at the Loisaida Center. They will bringing together 15 artists native to the southwest United States, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California to discuss futurism and geopolitics. Futurism is not just about technology but an act of self preservation and concern toward the creation and dismemberment of invisible borders, pillaging of natural resources, and colonization. Through decolonization and reclamation of traditions, personal culture, land and natural medicine.

Within the exhibition and workshops each artist addresses these issues blending their complex histories with a contemporary perspective creating a new trajectory.

Future Now/Futura Ahora will host multiple workshops on reclaiming use of the land and the natural remedies she provides you, discussions and screenings on chicanx futurism. The exhibition serving as a catalyst to discuss and initiate thinking and being in a time of increased tension and unknown.

Workshops:

Opening - February 4, 2017: Cultural Workers will perform followed by a discussion on the history and uses of the Agave. Tequila and Mezcal Tasting.

February 11, 2017: Nativa Remedies by Celeste Casillas: Community workshop on how to use traditional herbs in modern daily life and creating at home remedies influenced by elder and ancestral healing methods and the passing down of stories. Participants will make a salve to take home.

Rauschque workshop: creating small-scale altars from found or assisted objects that talk about cultural memory.

March 2017 TBD: Film Screening, Performance, and Discussion on using Art and Filmmaking to confront neo-colonialism on the US/MEXICO border.

TBD: Mural Workshop with Navajo and Chicana Muralist Nani Chacon

Cognitive mapping: realizing your space in a neighborhood

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#NoDAPL Solidarity Concert
Oct
17
8:00pm 8:00pm

#NoDAPL Solidarity Concert

Atomic Culture stands in resistance with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe to defend their sacred lands and water from the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

October 17th at Casa Mezcal

$10 Suggested door donation

Performances by
STEFA* (soundcloud.com/stefalives)
75 Dollar Bill (https://75dollarbill.bandcamp.com/)
Laura Ortman (https://thedustdiveflash.bandcamp.com/) + Raven Chacon (http://spiderwebsinthesky.com/)
On High (Instagram @onhighofficial)
DJ Young Ancient
Jewelry sold by Barbara Calderón

+ MORE TBA

100% of door proceeds will go to Standing Rock Sioux Land Protectors
20% of Drink sales will benefit Standing Rock Sioux
50% of Jewelry sales will benefit Standing Rock Sioux.

http://indigenousrising.org/about/

Happy Hour drink specials until 9:30PM

About Standing Rock Sioux Tribe & #NoDAPL

"The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) has taken a strong stand against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), a 1,134 ­mile long oil pipeline starting from the Bakken Oil Fields in North Dakota and ending up in refineries in Patoka, Illinois. It is proposed to transport over 570,000 barrels per day.
To date, more than 300 tribes and first nations officially stand with Standing Rock by way of tribal resolutions, letters of support, or tribal delegations joining the camp. There are entire cities and municipalities such as Santa Barbara, Seattle, and Minneapolis/St. Paul supporting them, and they aren't the only ones. There are millions of people the world over standing in solidarity as well. 80,000 people in Ireland rallied recently to say #NoDAPL. 

Dakota Access Pipeline would contribute to 50 million tonnes CO2 per year. This is­ the equivalent of 10 million cars or 15 coal plants. Every one of those tonnes of CO2 is a threat to all people on the planet. We can't all breathe poison air.
The pipeline is a huge risk to prairie, farm lands and critical waterways as well, including the Missouri River. It is a massive pipeline that would transport crude oil. News report after news report continues to come out about oil spills across the continent. It's never a matter of if the pipelines will leak and/or burst, it's a matter of when. Energy Transfer Partners, the owner of Dakota Access LLC, is already responsible for over $9 million in property damage stemming from their dirty operations. Thousands of gallons have already been spilled. We don’t want to be the next statistic and we don’t want our children’s futures threatened by fossil fuels.
They’ve already desecrated burial sites of ancestors, effigies, and rock formations critical to the spiritual, emotional, and psychological well-being of our communities. None of that can ever be brought back. That’s why everyone is here in support, so that no more of these abuses continue and healing can happen. This pipeline is proposed to cross the Missouri River, less than one mile away from our community and less than 500 feet from our border. 18 million people downstream stand to be affected, too. This is Standing Rock's fight but it's not just a native issue.
We have a saying here in Standing Rock: Mni Wiconi. It means "water is life," and it's true. You can't drink oil." - Standing Rock Sioux

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